Tarantula Species By Temperament

Aggressive Asian Tarantula Species

Cobalt Blue Tarantula (Haplopelma lividum) by Jon Fouskaris

Cobalt Blue Tarantula

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The Cobalt Blue Tarantula is one of the more beautiful, yet one of the more aggressive species of tarantula. The Cobalt Blue Tarantula looks almost black at a glance, but upon closer inspection, with certain lighting, this species shows a bright blue overall colour! These tarantulas are very popular, but aren't good for beginners. Cobalt Blue Tarantulas are extremely aggressive and fast. Even the spiderlings of this species have been known to show aggression! The Cobalt Blue Tarantula is uncommon in the wild, but is becoming more and more familiar in captivity. These tarantulas spin large webs even though they do spend most of their time in their burrow if given the opportunity. The Cobalt Blue Tarantula is an amazing tarantula for anybody who dares to keep it!

Photo Description: ADULT FEMALE - Specimen provided by Kelly Swift. - Photo taken by Zane "Cash" Vanlandingham Jr.

Range:

Semi-cleared tropical forests of Myanmar, Thailand, Laos and Cambodia.

Type:

Burrowing.

Diet:

Spiderlings eat pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, and other large insects.

Full Grown Size:

4 to 5 inches.

Growth Rate:

Fast speed.

Temperature:

80 to 90? F.

Housing:

Spiderlings can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 10-gallon tank. Floor space is as important as height.

Temperament:

Aggressive and nervous

Humidity:

78 to 82%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" leg span may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

Substrate:

5 to 6 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.

Decor:

No decorations are really needed. Moss can be added for floor cover, but leave some areas open for burrowing in the substrate.

Other Names:

N/A.


Aggressive South American Tarantula Species

Columbian Giant Tarantula (Megaphobema robustum) by Jon Fouskaris

Columbian Giant Tarantula

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The Columbian Giant Tarantula is a very beautiful, large, and unusual tarantula. They are a very popular species for advanced collectors, but they can get expensive. Columbian Giant Tarantulas are known for their unusual defensive behaviours. These tarantulas are of course able to flick urticating hairs and bite, like the usual New World tarantula species, but wait... there's more. They will stretch out their legs, and bob up and down as a first effort to scare away or intimidate the predator. If that doesn't work, then Columbian Giant Tarantulas will then spin in a circle while whipping their legs around trying to hit the predator with the sharp spikes on their back legs. The Columbian Giant Tarantula is an amazing tarantula species like no other!

Photo Description: ADULT FEMALE - Specimen provided by Worldwide Exotics. - Photo taken by Worldwide Exotics.

Range:

Tropical rainforests of Columbia, as well as northern and southern Brazil.

Type:

Burrowing.

Diet:

Spiderlings eat pinhead crickets. Adults eat crickets, other large insects, small lizards, pinkie mice, and even an occasional fuzzy mouse.

Full Grown Size:

6.5 to 8 inches.

Growth Rate:

Slow speed.

Temperature:

75 to 80? F.

Housing:

Spiderlings can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 10 to 15-gallon tank. Floor space is more important than height.

Temperament:

Aggressive and nervous

Humidity:

78 to 82%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" leg span may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

Substrate:

6 to 8 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.

Decor:

No decorations are really needed.

Other Names:

Columbian Redleg Tarantula, Columbian Giant Redleg Tarantula, and Giant Columbian Redleg Tarantula


Aggressive African Tarantula Species

King Baboon Tarantula (Citharischius crawshayi) by Jon Fouskaris

King Baboon Tarantula

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The King Baboon Tarantula is one of the most prized tarantulas in the hobby. These impressive tarantulas are rusty red to bright brown and reach a massive body size! The photo to the left shows an adult female next to a US 25 cent piece. Although the King Baboon Tarantula has many good features, it is an extremely aggressive species, and should be owned by experienced keepers only. These tarantulas will stand up on their hind legs in a defensive position, and even make a hissing noise at the first sign of danger, which can be almost anything to them such as fingers, a pair of tongs, etc. King Baboon Tarantulas have been known to stay in their burrows for months at a time, therefore they don't make the best display tarantulas. In the wild, they are found in deep burrows at the base of acadia bushes. The venom from King Baboon Tarantulas are said to be more toxic than most other tarantulas, which makes it more qualified to be kept by experienced hobbyists, and not beginners. Besides that, the King Baboon Tarantula makes a great tarantula for the serious collector!

Photo Description: ADULT FEMALE - Specimen provided by Mike - Photo taken by Mike

Range:

Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda in dry acadia scrublands

Type:

Burrowing

Diet:

Spiderlings eat pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, other large insects, pinkie mice, and an occasional fuzzy mouse.

Full Grown Size:

6.5 to 9 inches.

Growth Rate:

Slow speed.

Temperature:

75 to 90? F.

Housing:

Spiderlings can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 10 to 20-gallon tank. Floor space is as important as height.

Temperament:

Aggressive and nervous.

Humidity:

75 to 80%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" legspan may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

Substrate:

6 to 8 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.

Decor:

No decorations are really needed,but you can add a log, or cork bark.

Other Names:

N/A.


Aggressive Asian Tarantula Species

Malaysian Earth Tiger Tarantula (Cyriopagopus thorelli) by Jon Fouskaris

Malaysian Earth Tiger Tarantula

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The Malaysian Earth Tiger Tarantula is a very rare and beautiful Asian tarantula. They grow to a fairly large size, and are a gem to any serious hobbyist! The Malaysian Earth Tiger Tarantula is a fast and aggressive species, like many other tarantulas from Asia, and will not tolerate you getting near it. They will face anybody, or anything, even if they are grossly out-sized! The Malaysian Earth Tiger Tarantula can be hard to establish in captivity, because many wild-caught tarantulas are full of parasites. That is why captive-bred spiders should be bought over wild-caught spiders. The first captive breeding of this species in the US, and possibly the world, was in April 2000. It was a cooperative effort between Frank Somma and his partner Tommy. The eggsac was dropped in June of the same year, and it contained some 200 spiderlings. This tarantula is still not common enough for someone to easily obtain a captive-bred Malaysian Earth Tiger Tarantula. Until then, the Malaysian Earth Tiger Tarantula will remain to be a rare, beautiful, and challenging species for collectors to want, hope, and wait for.

Photo Description: SUB-ADULT FEMALE - Specimen provided by Frank Somma. - Photo taken by Jon Fouskaris.

Range:

Tropical rainforests of Malaysia, Thailand, and the Philippines.

Type:

Terrestrial, but will burrow to some extent

Diet:

Spiderlings eat pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, other large insects, small lizards, and an occasional pinkie mouse.

Full Grown Size:

6 to 8 inches.

Growth Rate:

Medium speed.

Temperature:

75 to 90? F.

Housing:

Spiderlings can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 5 to 10-gallon tank. Floor space is more important than height.

Temperament:

Aggressive and nervous

Humidity:

78 to 82%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" leg span may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

Substrate:

4 to 5 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.

Decor:

Live plants, driftwood, cork bark, etc. make good hiding places. Moss can be added for floor cover.

Other Names:

Asian Chevron Tarantula, and Malaysian Blue Tarantula.


Aggressive Asian Tarantula Species

Thailand Black Tarantula (Haplopelma minax) by Jon Fouskaris

Thailand Black Tarantula

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The Thailand Black Tarantula is a fast and very aggressive tarantula species. Thailand Black Tarantulas have been regarded to as "evil", "ferocious", and "wicked" by many experienced hobbyists, and trust me from first-hand experience, those are words of wisdom! These tarantulas aren't very colourful or rare, but they still make good challenges for tarantula collectors! Thailand Black Tarantulas can and will make deep burrows. Many Thailand Black Tarantulas that are imported from south-east Asia have parasites which has led to death in many spiders. That is one reason why you should buy a captive-bred tarantula over a wild-caught specimen. Thailand Black Tarantulas are on the less expensive side, when it comes to Asian tarantulas. If you are a hobbyist, and you think you can handle an "evil" tarantula, the Thailand Black Tarantula is a good species for you!

Photo Description: UNSEXED ADULT - Specimen provided by Steven Cheung. - Photo taken by Jon Fouskaris.

Range:

Tropical forests of Malaysia, Myanmar, Laos, Vietnam and Thailand.

Type:

Burrowing.

Diet:

Spiderlings eat pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, and other large insects.

Full Grown Size:

4 to 4.5 inches.

Growth Rate:

Fast speed.

Temperature:

80 to 90? F.

Housing:

Spiderlings can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 5 to 10-gallon tank. Floor space is as important as height.

Temperament:

Aggressive and nervous

Humidity:

78 to 82%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" leg span may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

Substrate:

5 to 6 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.

Decor:

No decorations are really needed. Moss can be added for floor cover, but leave some areas open for burrowing in the substrate.

Other Names:

Thai Black Tarantula, and Asian Bird Eating Spider.


Docile South American Tarantula Species

Brazilian Black Tarantula (Grammostola pulchra) by Jon Fouskaris

Brazilian Black Tarantula

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The Brazilian Black Tarantula has often been called the "best pet tarantula", with good reason. Brazilian Black Tarantulas are very docile, impressive, and hence the name, jet black tarantulas. They are in the same genus as the Chilean Rose Tarantula (Grammostola rosea), but are slightly larger and more active than Chilean Rose Tarantulas. The Brazilian Black Tarantula, like the Chilean Rose Tarantula, has been known to go on fasts lasting several months. They are very popular tarantulas, and you may find yourself paying a high price for even a spiderling, but remember that it is worth it. Females of this species have been known to live for over 20 years! The Brazilian Black Tarantula is a great tarantula for the classroom, for zoo displays, and for any collector.

Photo Description: ADULT FEMALE - Specimen provided by West Coast Zoological. - Photo taken by Mark Hart.

Range:

Grassland areas of Brazil and Uruguay

Type:

Terrestrial.

Diet:

Spiderlings eat pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, other large insects, small lizards, pinkie mice, and an occasional fuzzy mouse.

Full Grown Size:

5 to 6 inches

Growth Rate:

Slow speed.

Temperature:

75 to 85? F

Housing:

Spiderlings can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 10-gallon tank. Floor space is more important

Temperament:

Docile and calm.

Humidity:

75 to 80%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" leg span may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

Substrate:

3 to 5 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.

Decor:

No decorations are really needed, but you can add a log, or cork bark.

Other Names:

N/A.


Docile South American Tarantula Species

Chilean Rose Tarantula (Grammostola rosea) by Jon Fouskaris

Chilean Rose Tarantula

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The Chilean Rose Tarantula is one of the most commonly imported tarantulas in the trade today. This species of tarantula is a combination of being fairly large, hardy and docile. The Chilean Rose Tarantula can be found in almost any pet store, and can be found in two different colour phases. One of the colour phases of the Chilean Rose Tarantula is a tan to brown overall colour with pink hairs and a pink carapace, while the other is a tarantula with red hairs all over it's body. The photo to the left shows the brown and pink phase. These used to be classified under two different species, but they are now both known as Chilean Rose Tarantulas. There are many pet stores that carry Chilean Rose Tarantulas, although they may be under different names. Some of these names are listed below. The Chilean Rose Tarantula is the ultimate starter species, and should be considered for anybody who wants to dive into the hobby.

Photo Description: ADULT FEMALE - Specimen provided by Jon Fouskaris - Photo taken by Jon Fouskaris

Range:

Northern Chile and surrounding areas, found in many habitats, mostly deserts and scrubland.

Type:

Terrestrial.

Diet:

Spiderlings eat pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, other large insects, and an occasional pinkie mouse.

Full Grown Size:

4.5 to 5.5 inches.

Growth Rate:

Slow speed.

Temperature:

70 to 85? F.

Housing:

Spiderlings can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 5 or 10-gallon tank. Floor space is more important than height.

Temperament:

Docile and calm.

Humidity:

75 to 80%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" leg span may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

Substrate:

2 to 3 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.

Decor:

No decorations are really needed, but you can add a log, or cork bark.

Other Names:

Chilean Rose Haired Tarantula, Chilean Rose Hair Tarantula, Chilean Common Tarantula, Chilean Fire Tarantula, Chilean Fire Rose


Docile North American Tarantula Species

Costa Rican Zebra Tarantula (Aphonopelma seemani) by Jon Fouskaris

Costa Rican Zebra Tarantula

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The Costa Rican Zebra Tarantula is a great pet tarantula. It is a hardy, inexpensive spider with wonderful colouration! Even though it is a generally docile species, you shouldn't get the impression that this spider can be held. Costa Rican Zebra Tarantulas can display incredible speed if startled by the slightest occurrence. Although it is known as the Costa Rican Zebra Tarantula, there is a different colour phase to this species, that is not found in Costa Rica. This colour phase is dark brown with tan striping on the legs, and is from Nicaragua, as opposed to the Costa Rican form of black with white striping on the legs. The Costa Rican form is shown to the left. Both colour phases require the same conditions in captivity. The Costa Rican Zebra Tarantula is a good choice for a beginner or an expert.

Photo Description: ADULT FEMALE - Specimen provided by Carlos Viquez. - Photo taken by Carlos Viquez.

Range:

Southern United States to Costa Rica, Nicaragua and possibly areas in Guatemala, and Panama in tropical forests on the Pacific coast with secondary cleared land and hillside highland tropical forests.

Type:

Burrowing.

Diet:

Spiderlings eat pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, other large insects, and an occasional pinkie mouse.

Full Grown Size:

4 to 4.5 inches.

Growth Rate:

Medium speed.

Temperature:

70 to 85? F.

Housing:

Spiderlings can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 2.5 to 5-gallon tank. Floor space is more important than height.

Temperament:

Docile and nervous.

Humidity:

75 to 80%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" leg span may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

Substrate:

4 to 5 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.

Decor:

No decorations are really needed, but you can add a log, or cork bark. Moss can be added for floor cover, but leave some areas open for burrowing in the substrate.

Other Names:

Zebra Tarantula, Stripe Knee Tarantula, and Stripe Kneed Tarantula.


Docile North American Tarantula Species

Curlyhair Tarantula (Brachypelma albopilosum) by Jon Fouskaris

Curlyhair Tarantula

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The Curlyhair Tarantula is an ideal tarantula species for a beginner because of it's docile temperament and relatively large size. Although fairly common and easy on the pocket, this species is more than just a brown tarantula. Up close, Curlyhair Tarantulas have gold and tan hairs covering their bodies. The legs are a darker brown, in contrast to the practically bronze carapace. This comes out to be one fine-looking spider without being exceedingly colourful. Also, true to their common name, most Curlyhair Tarantulas have hair that looks curly (actually more wavy than curvy, but we'll let that slide). They are very hardy tarantulas that make lasting pets. They also make great "show" spiders since they can be taken out and handled, although handling should not take place frequently because there's always the possibility of the tarantula falling off your hand and splitting it's abdomen open (likely fatal). Curlyhair Tarantulas seem to have more personality (tarantulality) than the conventional starter species, the Chilean Rose Tarantula. Overall, Curlyhair Tarantulas are great for anybody, and yours may easily become a favourite in your collection!

Photo Description: ADULT FEMALE - Specimen provided by Jeroan Poot. - Photo taken by Jeroan Poot.

Range:

Mountain and cloud forests of Central America.

Type:

Terrestrial.

Diet:

Spiderlings eat pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, other large insects, small lizards, pinkie mice, and an occasional fuzzy mouse.

Full Grown Size:

5 to 5.5 inches.

Growth Rate:

Slow speed.

Temperature:

75 to 85? F

Housing:

Spiderlings can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 5 to 10-gallon tank. Floor space is more important than height

Temperament:

Docile and calm.

Humidity:

75 to 80%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" leg span may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

Substrate:

2 to 3 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.

Decor:

Logs, driftwood, cork bark, etc. make good hiding places.

Other Names:

Honduran Curlyhair Tarantula, and Woolly Tarantula.


Docile North American Tarantula Species

Martinique Pinktoe Tarantula (Avicularia versicolor) by Jon Fouskaris
*Information provided by Frank Somma

Martinique Pinktoe Tarantula

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The Martinique Pinktoe Tarantula has to be one of the most beautiful tarantula species in the world! When the spiderlings hatch out, they are a brillant blue color, and by the time they reach adult coloration, the Martinique Pinktoe Tarantula is covered in reds, greens, and even purples! The photo to the left shows the adult coloration. These attractive tarantulas can not be kept communally, like their relative the Pinktoe Tarantula (Avicularia avicularia). The Martinique Pinktoe Tarantula is a docile but skittish species that can be quick to run if disturbed. This still does not eliminate it from the beginner's category, but there are easier species out there. These colorful, fairly large tarantulas create strong webs in tree bark in the wild, and they will do the same in captivity if provided with branches or cork bark. Poor ventilation is a death sentence for a Martinique Pinktoe Tarantula, like many other tropical arboreal species. If the air in the tank is damp and stale, molds will grow, and death can occur from molds growing in the spider's lungs. A complete or half screen cover will do fine as a solution. For good reason, Martinique Pinktoe Tarantulas are among the most sought after tarantulas in the hobby.

Photo Description: UNSEXED JUVENILE - Specimen provided by Jon Fouskaris - Photo taken by Jon Fouskaris

Range:

Tropical areas of Martinique, Guadeloupe, and possibly the surrounding Caribbean islands.

Type:

Arboreal

Diet:

Spiderlings eat flightless fruit flies, pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, moths, flies, other large insects, and an occasional small lizard or pinkie mouse.

Full Grown Size:

5 to 6 inches.

Growth Rate:

Medium to fast speed

Temperature:

75 to 80? F.

Housing:

Spiderlings can live in a tall clear plastic container with air holes. Adults can live in a 5 to 10-gallon tank. Height is more important than floor space.

Temperament:

Docile and nervous.

Humidity:

75 to 80%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" legspan may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

Substrate:

2 to 3 inches of peat moss, potting soil, or wood chips.

Decor:

Branches, live plants, vines, etc. make good hiding places and provide a base for the web. Moss can be added for floor cover.

Other Names:

Antilles Pinktoe Tarantula, and Martinique Treespider.


Docile North American Tarantula Species

Mexican Bloodleg Tarantula (Aphonopelma bicoloratum) by Jon Fouskaris

Mexican Bloodleg Tarantula

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The Mexican Bloodleg Tarantula is easily one of the best beginner tarantulas on the market! A combination of the colour and gentle disposition makes the Mexican Bloodleg Tarantula an excellent pet species. These tarantulas are docile, and they don't flick urticating hairs very often. Due to their extremely slow growth, Mexican Bloodleg Tarantulas are also one of the longest lived tarantula species! Unfortunately, this species is rare, so many beginners won't be able to go into a pet shop and take one home with them. Also, captive breeding's are not frequent. When Mexican Bloodleg Tarantulas are available for sale, the price is high. The Mexican Bloodleg Tarantula is a fairly new species to the hobby, another factor when the price is involved. A unique thing about this species, is the males, upon maturity, loose all the orange and gold that you see in the picture to the left, and become completely black! This tarantula does not get very large, but it makes up for it's size in beauty. In conclusion, desirable Mexican Bloodleg Tarantulas can be expensive and hard to find, but for a beginner, they are well worth the money, and yours will be with you for a long time!

Photo Description: SUB-ADULT MALE - Specimen provided by Frank Somma. - Photo taken by Jon Fouskaris

Range:

Pacific side of southern Mexico, in scrubland and deserts.

Type:

Terrestrial, but will burrow to some extent.

Diet:

Spiderlings will eat pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults will eat crickets, and other large insects.

Full Grown Size:

3.5 to 4 inches.

Growth Rate:

Slow speed.

Temperature:

75 to 90? F.

Housing:

Spiderlings can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 5 to 10-gallon tank. Floor space is more important than height.

Temperament:

Docile and calm.

Humidity:

70 to 75%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" leg span may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

Substrate:

4 to 5 inches of potting soil or peat moss mixed with vermiculite. Some sort of hiding spot is a good addition to the tank set-up.

Decor:

No decorations are really needed, but you can add a log, or cork bark.

Other Names:

N/A.


Docile North American Tarantula Species

Mexican Redknee Tarantula (Brachypelma smithi) by Jon Fouskaris

Mexican Redknee Tarantula

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The Mexican Redknee Tarantula is probably the most popular of all pet tarantulas. It has been collected since the 1970's and 1980's. It was originally discovered by a collector named H.H. Smith in 1888. The Mexican Redknee Tarantula was one of the first species to enter the hobby and has been used as scary props in many films. This tarantula has been in films such as "Raiders of the Lost Ark", a couple James Bond series, and many others. The Mexican Redknee Tarantula is known to be one of the longest living tarantula species, with females living up to 30 years, which is an advantage over many other tarantula species. Whether you're a beginner, or an advanced hobbyist, you can't go wrong with a Mexican Redknee Tarantula. Due to this creature's gentle nature, colourful appearance, large body size, and long life, it is easy to see why the Mexican Redknee Tarantula is such a desired animal in the hobby.

Photo Description: SUB-ADULT FEMALE - Specimen provided by Frank Somma. - Photo taken by Jon Fouskaris

Range:

Pacific side of Mexico, in scrubland and deserts.

Type:

Terrestrial.

Diet:

Spiderlings will eat pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, other large insects, small lizards, pinkie mice, and an occasional fuzzy mouse.

Full Grown Size:

5 to 5.5 inches.

Growth Rate:

Slow speed.

Temperature:

75 to 90? F.

Housing:

Spiderlings can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 5 to 10-gallon tank. Floor space is more important than height.

Temperament:

Docile and calm.

Humidity:

75 to 80%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" leg span may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

Substrate:

2 to 3 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.

Decor:

No decorations are really needed, but you can add a log, or cork bark.

Other Names:

Mexican Orange Knee Tarantula, Mexican Red Kneed Tarantula, and Mexican Orange Kneed Tarantula.


Docile South American Tarantula Species

Pink Zebra Beauty Tarantula (Eupalastrus campestratus) by Jon Fouskaris
*Information provided by Frank Somma

Pink Zebra Beauty Tarantula

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The Pink Zebra Beauty Tarantula is a relatively new and very exciting species to the market. This pretty big, extremely docile tarantula is a great beginner's species and actually makes a good "pet bug". Pink Zebra Beauty Tarantulas are not common sights in pet shops, but you can probably find one by contacting the major dealers. In addition to looking good and being calm, part of the Pink Zebra Beauty Tarantula's appeal is it's hardiness. In other words, they usually don't die for any reason until they reach their maximum lifespan. When this species was originally imported, it came in small numbers, and it was thought to be Eupalastrus tenuitarsus. Now breeders have produced captive-bred spiderlings of this species, and the Pink Zebra Beauty Tarantula is beginning to enter the mainstream as a regular appearance on price lists. For good reason, tarantula keepers are calling the Pink Zebra Beauty Tarantula one of the best beginner species in the hobby!

Photo Description: ADULT FEMALE - Specimen provided by West Coast zoological - Photo taken by Mark Hart

Range:

Grasslands and savannahs of Paraguay.

Type:

Burrowing.

Diet:

Spiderlings eat pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, other large insects, and an occasional pinkie mouse.

Full Grown Size:

5 to 6 inches.

Growth Rate:

Slow speed.

Temperature:

75 to 80? F.

Housing:

Babies can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 5 to 10-gallon tank. Floor space is more important than height.

Temperament:

Docile and calm.

Humidity:

65 to 75%.

Substrate:

3 to 5 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.

Decor:

No decorations are really needed, but you can add a log, or cork bark.

Other Names:

Paraguayan Pink Zebra Beauty Tarantula.


Docile South American Tarantula Species

Pinktoe Tarantula (Avicularia avicularia) by Jon Fouskaris

Pinktoe Tarantula

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This species of pinktoe tarantula, known simply as the Pinktoe Tarantula, is common, docile, beautiful, and can be speedy. Although generally easy to rear, they can become more of a challenge if more than one are kept together in a terrarium. Unlike other tarantulas, the Pinktoe Tarantula may be kept socially, if provided with certain conditions detailed under "Housing" below. Ventilation is very important with this species, and many people have lost tarantulas due to the poor ventilation. These tarantulas need higher humidity than most other species as well, making ventilation even more important! If the air in the tank is damp and stale, moulds can grow, making it a dangerous environment for the tarantula. Death can occur from moulds growing in the spider's lungs. Overall, the Pinktoe Tarantula can be an inexpensive and rewarding tarantula species to keep in captivity.

Photo Description: ADULT FEMALE - Specimen provided by West Coast Zoological. - Photo taken by Mark Hart.

Range:

Tropical areas of Brazil, Trinidad, Guyana, French Guyana, Surinam, Venezuela, and throughout the Amazon Basin.

Type:

Arboreal.

Diet:

Spiderlings eat flightless fruit flies, pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, moths, flies, other large insects, and an occasional small lizard or pinkie mouse.

Full Grown Size:

4.5 to 5 inches.

Growth Rate:

Medium speed.

Temperature:

75 to 85? F.

Housing:

Spiderlings can live in a tall clear plastic container with air holes. Adults can live in a 10 to 40-gallon tank, depending on the number of tarantulas. This Avicularia species can be kept communally in a large, well-planted terrarium with many hiding spots and broad-leaved plants. There should be little or no cannibalism, especially if the tarantulas are about the same size. Height is more important than floor space.

Temperament:

Docile and active.

Humidity:

78 to 82%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" leg span may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

Substrate:

2 to 3 inches of peat moss, potting soil, or wood chips.

Decor:

Branches, live plants, vines, etc. make good hiding places and provide a base for the web. Moss can be added for floor cover.

Other Names:

Guyana Pinktoe Tarantula, Common Pinktoe Tarantula, and South American Pinktoe Tarantula.


Semi Aggressive South American Tarantula Species

Brazilian Red and White Tarantula (Lasiodora cristata) by Jon Fouskaris
*Information provided by Frank Somma

Brazilian Red and White Tarantula

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The Brazilian Red and White Tarantula is a large and colorful terrestrial species. It is a relatively new species in the United States, they started becoming mainstream between 1998 and 2000. Today, the Brazilian Red and White Tarantula is being bred pretty regularly, and it is enjoying a life of fame and high demand. The Brazilian Red and White Tarantula is not to be confused with other Brazilian black and white beauties such as the Brazilian Whiteknee Tarantula ( Acanthoscurria geniculata ), and the Brazilian Black and White Tarantula ( Brazilopelma colloratvillosum ). The photo to the left shows a possibly gravid adult female. Like any possibly gravid tarantula, if she molts, she will regain her pristine beauty, but she will not produce an eggsac. If she doesn't molt, she might not look her best, but she may bring over 1,000 new Brazilian Red and White Tarantulas into the hobby! This species is known to produce very small, almost tiny spiderlings, but with such a large number of babies, you can't blame them! This spider was formerly in the genus Vitalius, but it was transferred to Lasiodora in 2001. This species is even more beautiful than the specimen shown to the left, and if breeders keep up their steady pace, the Brazilian Red and White Tarantula is sure to be a regular in the hobby.

Photo Description: ADULT FEMALE - Specimen provided by Frank Somma - Photo taken by Jon Fouskaris

Range:

Found throughout the rainforests of eastern Brazil.

Type:

Terrestrial, but will burrow to some extent.

Diet:

Spiderlings eat flightless fruit flies, pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, other large insects, and small vertebrates.

Full Grown Size:

7 to 8 inches.

Growth Rate:

Medium speed.

Temperature:

75 to 80? F.

Housing:

Babies can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 10 to 15-gallon tank. Floor space is more important than height.

Temperament:

Semi-aggressive and nervous.

Humidity:

75 to 80%.

Substrate:

3 to 5 inches of peat moss.

Decor:

No decorations are really needed, but you can add a log, or cork bark.

Other Names:

Brazilian Striped Red Rump Tarantula, and White Striped Birdeater.


Semi Aggressive South American Tarantula Species

Brazilian Red Tarantula (Nhandu carapoensis) by Jon Fouskaris
*Information provided by Frank Somma

Brazilian Red Tarantula

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Brazilian Red Tarantulas are large and shaggy tarantulas. These rare tarantulas have long red hairs covering their body, that's how they got their common name! A Brazilian Red Tarantula can make a pretty good display tarantula since they are large and don't really burrow. Since the Brazilian Red Tarantula is from the non-extensive genus Nhandu, it can be picked out on a price list without much confusion. These tarantulas are aggressive, and are more on the skittish side. The urticating hairs from the Brazilian Red Tarantula are supposedly more severe than many other species, and they are not shy about flicking their hairs at a potential predator or threat, which could be it's owner! Not a beginner's species, the Brazilian Red Tarantula is a good display tarantula.

Photo Description: SUB-ADULT FEMALE - Specimen provided by Frank Somma. - Photo taken by Jon Fouskaris

Range:

Rainforests and savannahs of southern Brazil, and Paraguay.

Type:

Terrestrial.

Diet:

Spiderlings eat pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, other large insects, and an occasional pinkie mouse.

Full Grown Size:

6 to 6.5 inches.

Growth Rate:

Medium speed.

Temperature:

80 to 85? F.

Housing:

Babies can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 5 to 10-gallon tank. Floor space is more important than height.

Temperament:

Semi-aggressive and nervous.

Humidity:

75 to 80%.

Substrate:

3 to 5 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.

Decor:

No decorations are really needed, but you can add a log, or cork bark.

Other Names:

Brazilian Orange Tarantula.


Semi Aggressive South American Tarantula Species

Brazilian Salmon Pink Birdeater Tarantula (Laisodora parahybana) by Jon Fouskaris

Brazilian Salmon Pink Birdeater Tarantula

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The Brazilian Salmon Pink Birdeater is one of the largest tarantula species in the world! This tarantula is an active and robust tarantula species. The Brazilian Salmon Pink Birdeater is a relatively fast growing species, reaching lengths of up to 6 inches in just 1 year! This tarantula is a very good eater as well, and will rarely turn down a cricket, or any other live food item. You may think that these tarantulas are expensive, or even hard to find, but this is not the case. Brazilian Salmon Pink Birdeaters have many spiderlings at a time, sometimes over 2000, which makes them readily available, and inexpensive. Brazilian Salmon Pink Birdeaters don't burrow much nor do they make large webs, making them very good display tarantulas. The Brazilian Salmon Pink Birdeater is the ideal tarantula species for intermediate or advanced keepers, and should be in all serious tarantula collections!.

Photo Description: JUVENILE MALE - Specimen provided by Terence Choo. - Photo taken by Terence Choo.

Range:

Tropical rainforests of eastern Brazil.

Type:

Terrestrial.

Diet:

Spiderlings eat pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, other large insects, small lizards, pinkie mice, and an occasional fuzzy mouse.

Full Grown Size:

7.5 to 10 inches.

Growth Rate:

Fast speed.

Temperature:

75 to 85? F.

Housing:

Spiderlings can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 10 to 20-gallon tank. Floor space is more important than height.

Temperament:

Semi-aggressive and active.

Humidity:

78 to 82%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" leg span may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

Substrate:

3 to 5 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.

Decor:

Logs, driftwood, cork bark, etc. make good hiding places. Moss can be added for floor cover.

Other Names:

Brazilian Salmon Pink Tarantula, Brazilian Salmon Pink Bird Eating Tarantula, Salmon Pink Birdeater, Salmon Pink Bird Eating Tarantula, Salmon Pink Tarantula, Brazilian Pink Haired Birdeater, and Brazilian Pink Haired Bird Eating Tarantula.


Semi Aggressive South American Tarantula Species

Brazilian Whiteknee Tarantula (Acanthoscurria geniculata) by Jon Fouskaris

Brazilian Whiteknee Tarantula

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The Brazilian Whiteknee Tarantula is a relatively new and exciting species. It is large, and unlike many other large terrestrial tarantulas, it is beautiful. The Brazilian Whiteknee Tarantula is moderately aggressive. When disturbed, a Brazilian Whiteknee Tarantula does not usually bite, but it likes to flick the stinging, airborne urticating hairs that New World tarantulas are famous for using as a defense. The hairs are itchy, and most people get a rash from them, so watch out when you open your Brazilian Whiteknee Tarantula tank. This impressive tarantula can be expensive, but it is definitely worth it! Throughout 1998, the Brazilian Whiteknee Tarantula was the most desired tarantula species available and was in high demand. This tarantula is still a desired species due to it's combination of size, and beauty. The Brazilian Whiteknee Tarantula goes by many different common names, which can be confusing, although they are all similar. Some of the names are listed below. The Brazilian Whiteknee Tarantula makes an unbelievable display tarantula, and is sure to grab the attention of anybody who sees it!

Photo Description: ADULT FEMALE - Specimen provided by Frank Somma. - Photo taken by Michael Fouskaris.

Range:

Forests of northern Brazil.

Type:

Terrestrial.

Diet:

Spiderlings eat pinhead crickets and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, other large insects, small lizards, pinkie mice, and an occasional fuzzy mouse.

Full Grown Size:

7 to 8 inches.

Growth Rate:

Fast speed.

Temperature:

80 to 85? F.

Housing:

Spiderlings can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 10 to 15-gallon tank. Floor space is more important than height.

Temperament:

Semi-aggressive and nervous.

Humidity:

75 to 80%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" leg span may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

Substrate:

3 to 4 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.

Decor:

Logs, driftwood, cork bark, etc. make good hiding places. Moss can be added for floor cover.

Other Names:

Brazilian Whiteknee Birdeater, Brazilian Whitekneed Tarantula, Brazilian White Banded Bird Eating Tarantula, Brazilian Black and White Stripe Birdeater, White Knee Tarantula, Whitekneed Bird Eating Tarantula, Giant White Knee Birdeater, Giant Whitekneed Tarantula, and Santarem Pink Haired Bird Eating Tarantula.


Semi Aggressive South American Tarantula Species

Pinkfoot Goliath Tarantula (Pseudotheraphosa apophysis) by Jon Fouskaris
*Information provided by Frank Somma

Pinkfoot Goliath Tarantula

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The Pinkfoot Goliath Tarantula is a highly desirable and massive tarantula species! Although the Goliath Birdeater (Theraphosa blondi) is renowned for being the largest spider in the world, some breeders and hobbyists believe otherwise. The Pinkfoot Goliath Tarantula was described 187 years after the Goliath Birdeater, therefore it's not as well-known. Recently, this species changed from the Pseudotheraphosa genus to the Theraphosa genus. Whether or not it's the largest tarantula species, the Pinkfoot Goliath Tarantula is still an immense spider, with some specimens recorded up to 13 inches in legspan! In the wild, they are found in burrows up to 24 inches in the ground! Since most people can't provide it with that much substrate in captivity though, and since most people want to see their tarantula, four to eight inches of substrate is acceptable. The Pinkfoot Goliath Tarantula is a moderately aggressive species with severe urticating hairs. It is not a beginner's species. Unfortunately, Pinkfoot Goliath Tarantulas are very rarely bred in captivity. They also can't be exported anymore, since Venezuela is closed to exportation. Pinkfoot Goliath Tarantulas are some of the hardest to find tarantulas in captivity, and they are quite possibly the largest spiders on earth!

Photo Description: ADULT FEMALE - Specimen provided by Frank Somma. - Photo taken by Michael Fouskaris.

Range:

Venezuela.

Type:

Burrowing.

Diet:

Spiderlings eat pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, other large insects, and small vertebrates.

Full Grown Size:

9 to 13 inches.

Growth Rate:

Fast speed.

Temperature:

Around 80? F.

Housing:

Babies can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 15 to 20-gallon tank. Floor space is as important as height.

Temperament:

Semi-aggressive and nervous.

Humidity:

75 to 80%.

Substrate:

4 to 8 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.

Decor:

No decorations are really needed, but you can add a log, or cork bark.

Other Names:

Venezuelan Goliath Tarantula, Venezuelan Bird Spider, and Goliath Pinkfoot Tarantula.


Semi Aggressive South American Tarantula Species

Trinidad Chevron Tarantula (Psalmopoeus cambridgei) by Jon Fouskaris

Trinidad Chevron Tarantula

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The Trinidad Chevron Tarantula is one of the most popular arboreal species. It's large size, and interesting look makes it many people's favourite species! Trinidad Chevron Tarantulas have been acknowledged as "adorable" and "cuddly" due to it's fuzzy appearance. Hence the name, the Trinidad Chevron Tarantula has a chevron marking on it's abdomen, and has bright orange stripes on the ends of it's legs which visibly separates this species from most others tarantulas. Trinidad Chevron Tarantulas can be found in most collections because it is a common species. This species is a good choice for the intermediate keeper, even though they are fast tarantulas. Trinidad Chevrons are inexpensive, easily distinguishable captive tarantulas that are great for most tarantula collections.

Photo Description: ADULT FEMALE - Specimen provided by West Coast Zoological. - Photo taken by Mark Hart.

Range:

Tropical areas of Trinidad & Tobago.

Type:

Arboreal.

Diet:

Spiderlings eat flightless fruit flies, pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, moths, flies, other large insects, and an occasional small lizard or pinkie mouse.

Full Grown Size:

4.5 to 5.5 inches.

Growth Rate:

Fast speed.

Temperature:

75 to 85? F.

Housing:

Spiderlings can live in a tall clear plastic container with air holes. Adults can live in a 10 to 15-gallon tank. Height is more important than floor space.

Temperament:

Semi-aggressive and nervous.

Humidity:

78 to 82%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" leg span may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

Substrate:

2 to 3 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.

Decor:

Branches, live plants, vines, etc. make good hiding places and provide a base for the web. Moss can be added for floor cover.

Other Names:

N/A.


Semi Docile South American Tarantula Species

Brazilian Black and White Tarantula (Brazilopelma colloratvillosum) by Jon Fouskaris

Brazilian Black and White Tarantula

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The Brazilian Black and White Tarantula is a very rare, expensive, and desirable tarantula species! It is another beautiful black and white striped tarantula, like the Brazilian Whiteknee Tarantula (Acanthoscurria geniculata), but with broader strips of white hairs. This tarantula species can get fairly large too, adding to it's appeal. The Brazilian Black and White Tarantula is not usually seen for sale in the United States, but can be found easier in Europe. These tarantulas aren't too aggressive, but won't hesitate to flick urticating hairs if disturbed. Brazilian Black and White Tarantulas can be great display tarantulas because they are so hard to obtain, along with the beauty they possess. If you are looking for a great rare tarantula for your collection, keep this species in mind, and keep looking!

Photo Description: SUB-ADULT FEMALE - Specimen provided by Frank Somma - Photo taken by Jon Fouskaris

Range:

Savannah, grassland, and pampas areas of Brazil.

Type:

Terrestrial.

Diet:

Spiderlings eat pinhead crickets and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, other large insects, small lizards, pinkie mice, and an occasional fuzzy mouse.

Full Grown Size:

6.5 to 8 inches.

Growth Rate:

Medium speed.

Temperature:

80 to 85? F.

Housing:

Babies can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 10 to 15-gallon tank. Floor space is more important than height.

Temperament:

Semi-docile and calm

Humidity:

75 to 80%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" leg span may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

Substrate:

3 to 4 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.

Decor:

Logs, driftwood, cork bark, etc. make good hiding places. Moss can be added for floor cover.

Other Names:

Brazilian Giant Black and White Tarantula.


Semi Docile North American Tarantula Species

Costa Rican Red Tarantula (Brachypelma angustum) by Jon Fouskaris

Costa Rican Red Tarantula

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Although they do not have red bodies, Costa Rican Red Tarantulas are appealing, medium-sized, tarantulas. They get their name from the shaggy red hairs on the legs and abdomen. Costa Rican Red Tarantulas actually have a black to dark brown overall color. These tarantulas are not as docile as other Brachypelma species, but they are just as rewarding. Costa Rican Red Tarantulas will flick urticating hairs as a primary defense. They are smaller than most Brachypelma species also, but they are heavy-bodied. Costa Rican Red Tarantulas are pretty hard to obtain in captivity. Surprisingly, Costa Rican Red Tarantulas are usually not very expensive though. They resemble Mexican Redrump Tarantulas (Brachypelma vagans) in appearance, although Mexican Redrump Tarantulas are generally larger. If you a beginner, and are looking for a less docile species, the Costa Rican Red Tarantula should be considered.

Photo Description: ADULT FEMALE - Specimen provided by Jon Fouskaris - Photo taken by Jon Fouskaris

Range:

Forests of southern Mexico and Central America.

Type:

Terrestrial.

Diet:

Spiderlings eat pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, and other large insects.

Full Grown Size:

3.5 to 4 inches.

Growth Rate:

Medium speed.

Temperature:

75 to 85? F.

Housing:

Spiderlings can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 5 to 10-gallon tank. Floor space is more important than height.

Temperament:

Semi-docile and nervous

Humidity:

75 to 80%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" leg span may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

Substrate:

2 to 3 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.

Decor:

Logs, driftwood, cork bark, etc. make good hiding places.

Other Names:

N/A.


Semi Docile South American Tarantula Species

Greenbottle Blue Tarantula (Chromatopelma cyaneopubes) by Jon Fouskaris

Greenbottle Blue Tarantula

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The Greenbottle Blue Tarantula is one of the most beautiful tarantula species in the world. With metallic blue legs, a blue-green carapace, and a vibrantly orange abdomen, few other species can compete in the category of coloration. The genus name Chromatopelma actually derives from the Greek word "chroma", meaning "color". It is still a mystery why this species possesses such remarkable coloration, although bright markings do act as a warning for would-be predators in other venues of the animal kingdom. The Greenbottle Blue Tarantula is a resilient and easy-to-keep species in captivity. They can tolerate a wider temperature range and lower humidity levels than most South American species. There is still some confusion amongst tarantula keepers though as to whether this species should be kept in an arboreal or terrestrial set-up; with some hobbyists even calling them "semi-arboreal" due to the extensive webbing that they apply both vertically and horizontally. The range of the Greenbottle Blue Tarantula is believed to be limited to dry areas in northern Venezuela. In the spring of 2002, arachnologist Rick C. West traveled to Venezuela's Paraguan? Peninsula in search of these puzzling creatures. He found large webs of this species constructed near vegetation on sandy soil. Therefore, the reason Greenbottle Blue Tarantulas create such broad webs may be to secure a grip on their unstable and open habitat of shrubs and sand dunes. Needless to say; they are not arboreal. The Greenbottle Blue Tarantula is an intriguing, stunning, and wonderful species for any invertebrate enthusiast!

Photo Description: ADULT FEMALE - Specimen provided by Darwin Sinram - Photo taken by Jon Fouskaris

Range:

Desert and scrubland habitat of northern Venezuela.

Type:

Terrestrial

Diet:

Spiderlings eat pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, and other large insects.

Full Grown Size:

4 to 4.5 inches.

Growth Rate:

Medium speed.

Temperature:

70 to 85? F.

Housing:

Spiderlings can live in a clear plastic deli-container with air holes. Adults can live in a 5 to 10-gallon tank. Floor space is more important than height.

Temperament:

Semi-docile and nervous.

Humidity:

65 to 75%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" legspan may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.

Substrate:

2 to 3 inches of peat moss, or potting soil. Sand may be mixed into the substrate.

Decor:

Logs, driftwood, cork bark, etc. make good hiding places and provide a base for the web.

Other Names:

Venezuelan Greenbottle Blue Tarantula, and Orange Bottlebrush Tarantula.


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